Tennis In The Bahamas, ca. 1957.

Tennis In The Bahamas, ca. 1957.

“You’re not a mess, you’re brave for trying.”
Georgia Whots to Rakishi, “On Grey Seas” cir. 1947
“How often people speak of art and science as though they were two entirely different things, with no interconnection. An artist is emotional, they think, and uses only his intuition; he sees all at once and has no need of reason. A scientist is cold, they think, and uses only his reason; he argues carefully step by step, and needs no imagination. That is all wrong. The true artist is quite rational as well as imaginative and knows what he is doing; if he does not, his art suffers. The true scientist is quite imaginative as well as rational, and sometimes leaps to solutions where reason can follow only slowly; if he does not, his science suffers.”
Isaac Asimov, “Art and Science,” The Roving Mind, 1983.
Detail of Edgar Degas’s The Dance Lesson (1879)

Detail of Edgar Degas’s The Dance Lesson (1879)

"It’s no surprise that readers are better people. Having experienced someone else’s life through abstract eyes, they’ve learned what it’s like to leave their bodies and see the world through other frames of reference.

They have access to hundreds of souls, and the collected wisdom of all them. They have seen things you’ll never understand and have experienced deaths of people you’ll never know.

They’ve learned what it’s like to be a woman, and a man. They know what it’s like to watch someone suffer. They are wise beyond their years.”

Why Readers, Scientifically, Are The Best People To Fall In Love With
by Lauren Martin

Anonymous said: Hello! I love your blog. I was wondering do you like Anna Karina? And do you have a favourite film of hers?

Oh, thank you! Yes, I do like her. I think Une femme est une femme (1961) is my favourite of hers followed closely by Pierrot le fou (1965). Outside of Godard, I quite liked her in La religieuse (1966).